BM50 LOB setup

This is the place to brag about your brewhouse set-up. Pictures are greatly appreciated!
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rogerh
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Joined: Fri Jan 10, 2020 1:59 am
Model: 50 litres
Location: SE Qld, Australia

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Well, it's all come together. The new hood and LOB kit arrived, my sparky installed a 15amp power socket in the brew shed, and Saturday, my first ever brew with my "new" 2nd hand BM.

I used the baker's yeast/dextrose treatment to prepare the strike water, filled to the top mark (55 litres) then slowly lowered the grain-filled malt pipe into the main unit. I fitted the LOB kit then topped up the water to cover the top plate by about 15mm and floated the mash cap. After the mash, I hoisted out the malt pipe, no sparge, but let it drain briefly. Then the boil.

The range-hood is mounted on the brew trolley and swings out of the way for the malt pipe removal, then swings back in place for the boil.

The brew day went well, and after the boil, a quick stir to whirlpool then floating lid back on. After 20 minutes, I drained using the pump inlet t-piece ball valve mod. I ended up with two cubes (45 litres total) of clean Helles wort, OG 1.051. For anyone unfamiliar with the practice common here in Australia, the hot wort is drained into 20 litre HDPE containers, filled to the max, and the bung screwed on. After natural cooling, the wort can then be fermented at leisure - next day, next week, whenever. (The cubes actually hold about 22.5 litres of hot wort - they bulge a bit :D )

Anyway, some pics:
12.2 kg grain through 1.2mm mill gap
12.2 kg grain through 1.2mm mill gap
The electric winch makes life easy
The electric winch makes life easy
It took some time to locate the tie-down rod into the bottom plate
It took some time to locate the tie-down rod into the bottom plate
The LOB kit fitted
The LOB kit fitted
The floating lid
The floating lid
Heavy heavy!
Heavy heavy!
Steam away
Steam away
2100 feet elevation here, but achieved a good boil
2100 feet elevation here, but achieved a good boil
No sparge, but "lost" 1.7 litres due to relatively short draining duration
No sparge, but "lost" 1.7 litres due to relatively short draining duration
IPA
Posts: 277
Joined: Tue Feb 25, 2014 8:16 am
Model: 50 litres
Location: France

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With that amount of grain and only 45 litres of wort at 1051 your efficiency is really low. This is almost certainly due to the fact that the full malt tube was lowered into the liquor. You will notice an improvement if you fill the malt tube when it is in place. Fill it slowly bit at a time and mash (mix) thoroughly between each addition making sure that every grain is wet.
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rogerh
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Model: 50 litres
Location: SE Qld, Australia

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Yeah, the mash was really thick -- like very difficult to even stir it to any extent -- and when I cleaned out the mashpipe I noticed a lot of doughballs. My next mission is to fabricate an efficient mash stirrer to thoroughly mix the grain without adding too much oxygenation.

So, early days, and onwards and upwards...
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mashy
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Location: Mercia

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.... then slowly lowered the grain-filled malt pipe into the main unit.
If I understand correctly, the low efficiency was caused by adding the grain in one go.

You only need to hoist to remove.

Assemble the BM and add the grain gradually, continually stirring, a 3 blade mash paddle or spoon is good at this point.
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mashy
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I used the baker's yeast/dextrose treatment to prepare the strike water
Oooer. Never heard of that?
Very unusual.... What's it for?
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rogerh
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Location: SE Qld, Australia

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The two methods for removing dissolved oxygen (DO) in the strike water are:
(a) boil it vigorously for five minutes, then chill it down to strike temperature; and/or
(b) set up a mini fermentation, by dosing it with dried baker's yeast and dextrose (at ambient temperature). Leave it for 2 to 3 hours for the yeast to consume the DO, then dough in. The recommended dosage of each, for 60 litres strike water, is 30 grams.

Source: http://www.lowoxygenbrewing.com/

Reference lowering the filled malt pipe into the strike water, this was to simulate underletting.
IPA
Posts: 277
Joined: Tue Feb 25, 2014 8:16 am
Model: 50 litres
Location: France

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Been brewing with a BM for ten years and cannot for the life of me understand the need to remove oxygen. I have brewed almost all styles of beer with great results. There are far too many "experts" on the internet trying to make a simple process difficult. Strangely the majority are Mercan. And what do they know about beer ? Except how to take well tried European beer, twist it beyond recognition and still call it by the same name. IPA is one example. Never been anywhere near India doesn't taste like the original and certainly would not have been consumed with gusto by the army garrisoned there.
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rogerh
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Yeah, I understand where you're coming from.

I'm generally a follower of the KISS principle, but something about LOB intrigues me, so I'll give it a go, taste, compare, and see whether it's worthwhile for me.

Incidentally, I have in the last hour, ordered Graham Wheeler's book "Brew Classic European Beers at Home", based on the recommendations here on the forum. (Yours was one, I seem to remember) :beer:
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mashy
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Yes indeed IPA 1,000,000% agree.

I too have brewed many styles, for many years on the BM. Fermented 1000's of litres. I am very experimental and will try new ideas. I have designed mods that have later become production items.

But Lodo does not figure for me.

Different folks, different strokes... Let us know what you think. Perhaps try another brew traditionally and compare the two? Shane to not have another brew day this week :D :D
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mashy
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rogerh wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 8:41 am
Yeah, I understand where you're coming from.

I'm generally a follower of the KISS principle, but something about LOB intrigues me, so I'll give it a go, taste, compare, and see whether it's worthwhile for me.

Incidentally, I have in the last hour, ordered Graham Wheeler's book "Brew Classic European Beers at Home", based on the recommendations here on the forum. (Yours was one, I seem to remember) :beer:
This was also very bold as your first brew. Well done. GW's book will not disappoint.
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rogerh
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Location: SE Qld, Australia

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Hey mashy and IPA,

I certainly respect that you guys have made nice beers, as have I (mostly ales), but I've never actually tasted a fresh commercial beer (as in lighter German styles) brewed using LODO techniques, so I have nothing to compare with. You guys over in Europe are probably spoiled for choice in that regard. Out of interest, have you ever drunk home brew done this way?

I'm reminded of an amusing (to me) little exercise some years ago when digital terrestrial tv was introduced. Being an early adopter, I rushed out, bought a digital set-top box and was amazed at the picture quality improvement. (As in, watching tennis, you could actually see the balls in flight). So next time I was over at a neighbour's property (we're in the bush) I took the STB with me to demo it for them.

Wife: What's that thing
Me: A set top box
Wife: What's it do?
Me: Should give you a crystal clear picture on the telly
Wife: Nothing wrong with what we've got - take it away
Hubbie: No, give it a go
A few minutes later, after tuning in the available channels, up pops the picture.
Wife's jaw drops momentarily (but not so quickly that I didn't see her reaction) then says "Yeah, I 'spose it's alright".
Being a lady of few words, that translated to "holy crap - feckin' brilliant!"
IPA
Posts: 277
Joined: Tue Feb 25, 2014 8:16 am
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Location: France

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Back to the OP
With 12.2 kg of grain and a brew length of 47 litres (44 in the fv) the OG in my system would be 1.066. That is significantly higher than 1.051. My efficiency is 83%. Follow my advice about mashing and you will achieve the same.
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rogerh
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I'll steer clear of the underletting. It complicated things big time. With my HERMS system, I set the efficiency at 81% and I was bang on with my numbers, so I'd expect at least as good in the BM. (doughing in the same way, bit by bit and stirring all the way)

Incidentally, I'm using Beersmith 2, and to download (add-on) a profile for the BM50, it shows up in the list of add-ons, but I cannot get it to show in the list of equipment profiles I can choose from. If you're familiar with Beersmith, any ideas?
IPA
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Joined: Tue Feb 25, 2014 8:16 am
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I am not familiar with Beersmith. I use a free programme designed by the author of the book that you have just purchased, the late Graham Wheeler, called Beer Engine. You can download it for free on Jims Beer Kit. If you need any help on how to use it with the BM just shout.
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rogerh
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IPA wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 1:10 pm
With 12.2 kg of grain and a brew length of 47 litres (44 in the fv) the OG in my system would be 1.066. That is significantly higher than 1.051. My efficiency is 83%. Follow my advice about mashing and you will achieve the same.
Hi IPA

Second brew just finished. With attention to good stirring of the grain, no sparge, and after a short drain on the lower pegs, I lifted the pipe out but this time collected the run-off which continued after it was lifted out. I tipped this back into the boil, and my calculations show a tad over 83% mash efficiency. Does this sound about right to you?

60' mash, 60' boil, 11kg grain yielded 51 litres into cubes @ 1.050

Thanks for your help.
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