Yeast Bay liquid Yeasts

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Yeast Bay liquid Yeasts

Unread postby BrauTim » Thu Oct 30, 2014 11:10 am

I've just ordered this little selection to experiment with:

Yeast Bay Wlp4025 - Dry Belgian Ale
Yeast Bay Wlp4015 - Northeastern Abbey
Yeast Bay Wlp4020 - Wallonian Farmhouse
Yeast Bay Wlp4627- Funktown Pale Ale

Can't wait to try them, I'll be brewing 42L batches split into two and fermenting with different yeast to get two styles out of the same batch.

Just thinking how I could work this efficiently for my next 2 brews using up all the yeasts, I've got Pilsner, Ale, Wheat, Abbey, Munich, Special B and Crystal malts, I've also got some dried yeasts to use up.

So from a single grist which two yeasts could be used? Initially I'm thinking a light colour for the Belgian & Abbey yeasts but with a light crystal and/or higher mash to offset the dryness of the Belgian and maybe a slightly darker for the Farmhouse & Funktown. Or should I keep them seperate?

Any ideas?
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Re: Yeast Bay liquid Yeasts

Unread postby BrauTim » Thu Oct 30, 2014 4:29 pm

I'm tempted to do a dark beer with one of these, either Porter or Stout style, which yeast would you recommend I use for a dark beer?
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Re: Yeast Bay liquid Yeasts

Unread postby BrauTim » Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:56 pm

I've not managed to get around to using these yeasts yet, but I have been growing up the Northeastern Abbey for this weekend when I will be brewing a Belgian Stout Porter. I'm going to split the batch into 2 x 20L, pitch one with the Abbey yeast (75-80% attenuation) and the other with WLP028 Edinburgh Ale (attenuation 70-75%, this is a superb yeast that I've used in an ESB so far).

I tried a couple of Continental Stout's when visiting Holland and they were so tasty that I want to try and recreate something similar.

The malt bill is looking similar to this:

Pilsner 50%
Munich II 20%
Wheat Malt Dark 10%
Special B 7%
Crystal Dark 7%
De-husked roast barley 5%

OG will be 1.056 expecting mid 5% strength for both beers with an IBU of 30 using British hops.
Mash will be stepped to give good ferment ability and body (my usual for most beers is 45 mins 63C, 45 mins 71C, 10 mins mashout 78C)

Anymore suggestions for the recipe?
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Re: Yeast Bay liquid Yeasts

Unread postby Nesto » Wed Jan 14, 2015 9:39 pm

BrauTim wrote:I've not managed to get around to using these yeasts yet, but I have been growing up the Northeastern Abbey for this weekend when I will be brewing a Belgian Stout Porter. I'm going to split the batch into 2 x 20L, pitch one with the Abbey yeast (75-80% attenuation) and the other with WLP028 Edinburgh Ale (attenuation 70-75%, this is a superb yeast that I've used in an ESB so far).

I tried a couple of Continental Stout's when visiting Holland and they were so tasty that I want to try and recreate something similar.

The malt bill is looking similar to this:

Pilsner 50%
Munich II 20%
Wheat Malt Dark 10%
Special B 7%
Crystal Dark 7%
De-husked roast barley 5%

OG will be 1.056 expecting mid 5% strength for both beers with an IBU of 30 using British hops.
Mash will be stepped to give good ferment ability and body (my usual for most beers is 45 mins 63C, 45 mins 71C, 10 mins mashout 78C)

Anymore suggestions for the recipe?


Don't really have any suggestions, but I'm curious... are the any commercial examples close to what you're trying? I've never tried dark wheat malts before, but it sounds interesting. Did the yeast come packaged like regular White Labs yeast? I wonder if they'll switch over to the new White Labs PurePitch packaging?
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Re: Yeast Bay liquid Yeasts

Unread postby BrauTim » Thu Jan 15, 2015 12:11 am

Nesto wrote:
BrauTim wrote:
Don't really have any suggestions, but I'm curious... are the any commercial examples close to what you're trying? I've never tried dark wheat malts before, but it sounds interesting. Did the yeast come packaged like regular White Labs yeast? I wonder if they'll switch over to the new White Labs PurePitch packaging?


I not aware of any commercial examples, I haven't looked but would assume that an example would be difficult to find in the UK anyway, maybe some of the specialist beer retailers may have something in stock. Googling finds examples and even some hints at recipes. This is an experimental brew for me :shock:

The yeast is packaged exactly the same as White Labs with the same gold and black label and even has the White Labs logo and states that it is produced by them, contract yeast production I guess.
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Re: Yeast Bay liquid Yeasts

Unread postby dinnerstick » Thu Jan 15, 2015 8:52 am

also curious. i've had a few belgian-yeast stouts but have never been hugely impressed. let's see, there's the dupont stout, it's nice, very dry of course, light on the roast, but there's not much about it that says stout to me, and there's the goofy one with hercule poirot on the bottle, more roast, also drinkable and fine but not memorable, i think that one's more of an abbey yeast than a saison yeast like the dupont. buffalo stout, but i had it once at the end of a long session so don't quite remember the specifics. fantome makes some dark beers, maybe a stout? can anyone recommend a real knockout one? the stouts brewed here in NL tend to be american-imperial (famously de molen and emelisse), milk and 'export' stouts are becoming more popular (try de prael milk stout- excellent or oedipus 'panty'), but again US/UK yeasts, and dry stouts are catching on a bit.
the closest thing i have done is using the very fruity brett trois strain (which may not be brett after all), it ferments very dry like a saison but gives mango/passionfruit flavors, at least when used with fruity hops, i wondered what it would do with roast, so i made a stout with it from a basic stout recipe but beefed up with unmalted stuff to keep some body, as i always do with this strain. it was disgusting and i dumped it down the drain. the predominant flavor was weird grainy-metallic. luckily it was just a small batch on the stovetop. wow, i have managed to just talk about myself rather than contribute anything useful, but hey i never claimed to be mother theresa.
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Re: Yeast Bay liquid Yeasts

Unread postby BrauTim » Thu Jan 15, 2015 10:50 am

I would be frightened if you were Mother Theresa Dinnerstick :D

The definition of Stout, or Stout Porter to be more traditionally precise is, I think, muddled in today's modern brewing practice. Traditionally Porter was the only dark beer made a couple of hundred years ago, then came Stout Porter and Mild (was it mild Porter?) and so on. So Porter seems to have given birth to lots of variants, some stouts are more like a dark ale than a black thick chewy thing such as Guinness, and who said Guinness should be held up as the epitome of a stout. It does seem to me that Stouts and Porters can have as much variation as Saison.

I don't know, I'm a confused homebrewer just trying to recreate some flavours that I've enjoyed elsewhere, I'm not particularly worried about the definition and if it all goes Pete Tong then at least I'll have a batch made with Edinburgh yeast to save the day. Of course if it all goes right, then I could be onto a competition winner!

Lottery brewing :D
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Re: Yeast Bay liquid Yeasts

Unread postby dinnerstick » Fri Jan 16, 2015 2:55 pm

indeed beer styles are difficult if not impossible to define. do you go by a historical reference, a flavor profile, a popular example, or by ingredients? none of those quite works. are beer categories even useful? probably not for the brewer, but as a consumer i do want some indication on the bottle of what's in there, or i get a bit cheesed off. i hate bottles with no hint whatsoever as to whether it's a hefeweizen or a double ipa. surprise me with the quality of the beer, not with the style. so with stouts and porters i go by my own vague idea of what's what, based on what is being made today, and probably what i enjoyed in my younger formative years of discovering craft beer (sam smith's taddy porter and oatmeal stout spring to mind). which means that there has to be a certain darkness in color and flavor, more ashy-roastiness for stout and more burnt-acrid for a porter. i know ash and acrid don't sound nice but it's hard to describe the flavor differences that tend to separate the two... roast barley vs dark chocolate malt, if you know what i mean, but indeed those are my standards, and are possibly arbitrary/meaningless to anyone else. but i definitely don't hold guiness as the reference for stout. i don't have a problem with it, but it's not anything special, and definitely not chewy in my opinion- more bone dry! so this is all why the dupont stout, for example, doesn't say stout to me, it doesn't meet my totally arbitrary threshold of roastiness, and then the spicy saison yeast confuses my stout expectations further. this isn't a bad thing at all, and it is totally separate from me not finding it an amazing beer (mind, i am not crazy; i hold saison dupont, and their christmas beer- bons voeux whatever it's called, in the highest regard).

the reason my reply is so wordy is that this is the kind of crap i love to 'argue' about over a few pints! the end result is always that we all differ and the terms don't hold much water, and that the enthusiasm for the topic slowly increases and then drops off rapidly as the beer tally rises. i do love the history of these styles as you bring up, we are lucky enough here in the netherlands beer geekery scene to have beer historian ron pattinson around, he is always at the beer festivals for a chat and often gives historical presentations and such, including on stouts/porters, on old ales and brettanomyces, etc.

well there we have it... a totally off-topic diversion. back on topic, hopefully your experiments don't go all nick mupp (rhyming slang for tits up?), i don't see any reason why they would, there's not even anything that crazy there. i've never used the edinburgh yeast but have heard only good things about it, and i am very curious how the abbey stout comes out in comparison. my only comment on the grain bill, is it a bit high on the crystal? 14% (dark + special b) seem high to me. is the grain bill close to what you have seen given for, say, the dupont stout? the absence of normal roast or black barley or even chocolate would certainly explain the very mellow roastiness in that beer. ok, enough, good luck!
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