Beer Clarity Corona Clone experiment

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Re: Beer Clarity Corona Clone experiment

Unread postby Tipsy » Fri Aug 29, 2014 5:04 am

Dicko wrote:It is a Corona Clone
90% pils malt
10% flaked rice
22 ibu Galena @ 60 mins
Brewbrite @10 mins
Wyeast 2001 yeast


Hey Dicko,
Is flaked rice in Corona?
I did a Corona clone years ago but used corn.
From memory it was pretty good but using rice may be even more 'neutral' for want of a better word.

Now that I'm using a Braumeister I really should be trying more of these light tasting beers. :cheers:
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Re: Beer Clarity Corona Clone experiment

Unread postby Dicko » Fri Aug 29, 2014 8:01 am

Tipsy wrote:
Dicko wrote:It is a Corona Clone
90% pils malt
10% flaked rice
22 ibu Galena @ 60 mins
Brewbrite @10 mins
Wyeast 2001 yeast


Hey Dicko,
Is flaked rice in Corona?
I did a Corona clone years ago but used corn.
From memory it was pretty good but using rice may be even more 'neutral' for want of a better word.

Now that I'm using a Braumeister I really should be trying more of these light tasting beers. :cheers:


Mate, I think you could be correct, however I did not want corn in my experiment as it may be confused with DMS.

:cheers:
The worst thing that can happen if I die is that my wife will sell all my brewing equipment for what I told her I paid for it
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Re: Beer Clarity Corona Clone experiment

Unread postby McMullan » Sun Sep 07, 2014 9:16 pm

Dicko wrote:Niels, that is a great picture.
When I started on my journey to achieve a clear beer my first step was to replace my plate chiller with an immersion unit so I could avoid trub carry over into the fermenter.
I boil the wort with my dome on for 80 minutes and add Brewbrite at between 10 and 5 minutes.
I then chill as rapidly and as cold as possible using tap water initially and then an ice slurry pumped through the chiller.
I then leave the wort in the kettle for 1 hour to settle.
I then decant around 200 mls of wort and discard as this first bit will contain trub and hop debris.
I then drain the kettle into the fermenter with the tap about half way open so as not to drag any trub into the fermenter. As the kettle is nearly empty I lift the back edge onto a small piece of wood to allow all of the clear wort to flow out but at the same time being EXTREMELY careful not to carry any trub with it.
My loss to trub is commonly 4 litres.
I found an incredible improvement in my beers after adopting this procedure as I strongly believe it is trub from the kettle that causes off flavours and cloudy beers that once present can not be removed at least at the home brew level.
I have wort samples that continually look as clear as the pic above.
Another thing that I have noticed is that the trub after fermentation is extremely clean and from this it is very easy to salvage some yeast for another brew.

Some may argue that this is going overboard and I am the first to agree if I was making an IPA or an APA, Porter or Stout but to get a light coloured lager to be clean bright and clear both visually and with the taste can be a real challenge at the home brew level.

:cheers:


Hey, Dicko. I reckon you're on to something there with that procedure. Earlier in the year I was brewing a lot of Kolsch. My best batch resulted from an 'error'. Mains water for the cold break was about 6-7 degrees C. Down rapidly (~7min) to 16 degrees and then left it to settle for 2h. When I got back home after an errand, I noticed I hadn't turned off the tap. Wort was about 8 degrees! Ended up putting the fermenter containing the cold wort in my ferm chamber (16 degrees) over night and pitched the yeast starter the following morning. 4 weeks at 16 (with max attenuation for WLP029), kegged and 2 weeks at 2 degrees. Fantastically clear Kolsch. Tasted the business too :D
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Re: Beer Clarity Corona Clone experiment

Unread postby Dicko » Sun Sep 07, 2014 10:07 pm

I can only wish I had a water supply that was 8 deg.

I chill it below the tap temperature with an ice slurry.

I feel it is great when you can pitch colder than your planned fermentation temp and then raise the wort temp to suit. I did read somewhere that this practice is good but I cant remember where I found that information.

I kegged another Pils yesterday using the exact same methods with the same results...I cant believe how clean and clear the beer is. :D

:cheers:
The worst thing that can happen if I die is that my wife will sell all my brewing equipment for what I told her I paid for it
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Re: Beer Clarity Corona Clone experiment

Unread postby BrauTim » Sun Sep 07, 2014 10:34 pm

McMullan wrote:
Dicko wrote:
Niels, that is a great picture.
When I started on my journey to achieve a clear beer my first step was to replace my plate chiller with an immersion unit so I could avoid trub carry over into the fermenter.
I boil the wort with my dome on for 80 minutes and add Brewbrite at between 10 and 5 minutes.
I then chill as rapidly and as cold as possible using tap water initially and then an ice slurry pumped through the chiller.
I then leave the wort in the kettle for 1 hour to settle.
I then decant around 200 mls of wort and discard as this first bit will contain trub and hop debris.
I then drain the kettle into the fermenter with the tap about half way open so as not to drag any trub into the fermenter. As the kettle is nearly empty I lift the back edge onto a small piece of wood to allow all of the clear wort to flow out but at the same time being EXTREMELY careful not to carry any trub with it.
My loss to trub is commonly 4 litres.
I found an incredible improvement in my beers after adopting this procedure as I strongly believe it is trub from the kettle that causes off flavours and cloudy beers that once present can not be removed at least at the home brew level.
I have wort samples that continually look as clear as the pic above.
Another thing that I have noticed is that the trub after fermentation is extremely clean and from this it is very easy to salvage some yeast for another brew.

Some may argue that this is going overboard and I am the first to agree if I was making an IPA or an APA, Porter or Stout but to get a light coloured lager to be clean bright and clear both visually and with the taste can be a real challenge at the home brew level.

:cheers:


Hey, Dicko. I reckon you're on to something there with that procedure. Earlier in the year I was brewing a lot of Kolsch. My best batch resulted from an 'error'. Mains water for the cold break was about 6-7 degrees C. Down rapidly (~7min) to 16 degrees and then left it to settle for 2h. When I got back home after an errand, I noticed I hadn't turned off the tap. Wort was about 8 degrees! Ended up putting the fermenter containing the cold wort in my ferm chamber (16 degrees) over night and pitched the yeast starter the following morning. 4 weeks at 16 (with max attenuation for WLP029), kegged and 2 weeks at 2 degrees. Fantastically clear Kolsch. Tasted the business too :D


My process is very similar and I get similar results, I'm amazed at the cleanliness of the yeast slurry at the end of primary and how little there actually is to clean up.
To brew or not to brew, that would be a stupid question !
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