Ordinary English Bitter

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Ordinary English Bitter

Unread postby BrauTim » Sat Jun 21, 2014 1:28 pm

Here's the recipe for my Ordinary Bitter in the 'Present your Brau' thread. It's my 3rd attempt at 50L of a lower ABV English Bitter and I think this one is just about spot on and well balanced for my tastes. Apart from my usual water treatments to get the water correct for style I added two teaspoons of gypsum as the boil was starting to bring the hops out a bit more because my earlier attempts have mostly been malt biased (which I also enjoy).

Also I managed to obtain brewery yeast from Stuey who recently started to operate the Howard Town Brewery in Glossop, UK, his strain is the house strain which is 6 months on from an original Theakston's strain and I was advised to ferment at around 24°C which I did. To try this recipe for yourself I would recommend using a Yorkshire strain or Ringwood from the liquid yeast suppliers or Nottingham, Mauri 514, Safale SO4 or something similar and just follow their fermentation temp recommendations.

Mashing in @ 38°C means that the grains get a short rest at all temp ranges on the way to 67°C. Also I added the Crystal for the last 30 mins of the mash and the mash had a stir at the 1st 30 minute point so had two stirs, pH was 5.4.

The Goldings steeped for 30 mins before cooling which took another 25-30 mins.

Also, I am trying to follow a Paleo/Primal lifestyle and diet, the idea is to reduce carbohydrate and sugar consumption and to remove grains and gluten from the diet completely, obviously giving up beer would be a step too far! But this is the first beer that I've attempted to reduce gluten in by adding 2 vials of ClarityFerm at the beginning of fermentation, I've no way of testing for gluten content but it doesn't appear to have adversely affected the flavour of the beer in any way.

Fermentation was complete in 3 days, I left it in primary at 24°C for 3 more days, dropped to 15°C for 2 days, 8°C for 3 days fined with Gelatine, then dropped into kegs and carbonated and kept at 2°C for 2 weeks whilst I went on holiday, it was drinkable out of the fermenter but properly ready after return from holiday served at 11°C and I'm sure it would have been ready within 3 weeks had I been at home.

Higher than expected efficiency meant that OG was 1.043 and finished at 1.012 giving me 4.1% ABV vs estimated 3.7% ABV.

This is a medium light bodied, easy drinking beer, made for hot Summer days, English hop flavour is balanced with medium gentle bitterness that fades, fresh and refreshing, low esters, carbonate up to 2 vols, medium head which slowly fades to a ring but lasts for the time it takes to drink a pint, some lacing, easy to drink multiple pints if that is your want :wink:

Recipe: Roundwood Best Bitter
Brewer: BrauTim
Style: English Ordinary Bitter
TYPE: All Grain


Recipe Specifications
--------------------------
Boil Size: 60.02 l
Post Boil Volume: 52.52 l
Batch Size (fermenter): 50.00 l
Bottling Volume: 47.00 l
Estimated OG: 1.039 SG
Estimated Color: 8.8 SRM
Estimated IBU: 38.0 IBUs
Mash Efficiency: 90 %
Boil Time: 90 Minutes

Ingredients:
------------
Amt Name
6.50 kg Dingemans Pale Malt (2 Row) Bel (3.0 SRM) 79.3 %
0.75 kg Munich Malt - 10L (14.0 SRM) 9.1 %
0.50 kg Caramel/Crystal Malt - 60L (100.0 SRM) 6.1 %
0.45 kg Wheat Malt, Bel (2.0 SRM) 5.5 %
17.00 g Challenger [9.53 %] - Boil 90.0 min 10.1 IBUs
30.25 g Target [11.00 %] - Boil 60.0 min 19.4 IBUs
81.00 g Goldings, East Kent [5.00 %] - Steep 8.5 IBUs




Mash In 50 litres @ 38°C
Raise temp to 67°C for 90 mins
Mash Out 78°C 10 mins
Rinse grains 7 litres
Top up 5 litres
To brew or not to brew, that would be a stupid question !
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Re: Ordinary English Bitter

Unread postby Cervantes » Sun Jun 22, 2014 2:53 am

Thanks for that.

I'll have to give this a go at some point.

I'm guessing that it's based loosely on Ringwood Best?
Cheers :cheers:
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Re: Ordinary English Bitter

Unread postby BrauTim » Sun Jun 22, 2014 9:57 am

Cervantes wrote:
I'm guessing that it's based loosely on Ringwood Best?


Yes & No, this one has been mostly based on past experience, intuition and the hops available in my freezer :lol: I call it Roundwood Bitter as I've named my Brewery 'Woodland Brewery' and I like Ringwood ales (on cask). In the past I have brewed with Ringwood yeast and a different recipe to produce an Old Thumper clone and a Best Bitter clone, with slightly different hops and no Munich.

The strain of yeast used, makes this a low ester beer which is less like Ringwood, I may try a more estery yeast for an Autumn Bitter using the same basic ingredients.

I probably brew a bitter 3-4 times a year as I'm trying to get to a 'house' Bitter recipe, I'm doing the same with Wheat beer looking for that house Wheat that will always be available.
To brew or not to brew, that would be a stupid question !
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Re: Ordinary English Bitter

Unread postby niels » Sun Jun 22, 2014 12:03 pm

Thanks for sharing! I'll put this on my to-brew list (probably by the end of the summer).

- Niels
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Re: Ordinary English Bitter

Unread postby Jackson » Mon Jun 23, 2014 1:53 pm

Thanks for posting.nwas looking at doing a similar OG beer at some point but thought there was a lower limit on the amount of grain you can use in the BM, is this the case?
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Re: Ordinary English Bitter

Unread postby Dicko » Mon Jun 23, 2014 2:25 pm

Thanks for posting BT.
The "steep" addition of goldings hop at the end of the boil has me wondering.
It is an 81 gramm addition, and do you add it at flame out and hold the wort hot for a certain time?
I tend to add a steep addition by cooling the wort to 80 deg c then adding the hops and hold the wort at 80 deg for a nominated time, usually 10 minutes and then continue chilling.
By doing it this way Beersmith calculates the IBU effect it has on the overall bitterness.
I would appreciate what method you use?

:cheers:
Last edited by Dicko on Mon Jun 23, 2014 11:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Ordinary English Bitter

Unread postby BrauTim » Mon Jun 23, 2014 2:38 pm

Dicko wrote:Thanks for posting BT.
The "steep" addition of goldings hop at the end of the boil has me wondering.
It is an 81 gramm addition, and do you add it at flame out and hold the wort hot for a certain time?
I tend to add a steep addition by cooling the wort to 80 deg c then adding the hops and hold the wort at 80 deg for a nominated time, usually 20 minutes and then continue chilling.
By doing it this way Beersmith calculates the IBU effect it has on the overall bitterness.
I would appreciate what method you use?

:cheers:


I'm glad you posted this question Dicko because I'd forgotten this tiny but important detail. Just as you do I cooled the wort to 80C then added my hops for a steep, I didn't maintain the temp and just let the wort slowly cool for 30mins before starting my chiller again which ran for about another 25 mins.

I don't pay absolute attention to beersmith because there are too many variables for beersmith to handle including water chemistry. I use beersmith mainly as a guide, so the IBU's may not be exact but taste wise I'd say they are in range.

Also bear in mind that it may take 2 months for me to drink this batch and hop flavour, aroma and bitterness perception may diminish as aroma fades (assuming it will fade).
To brew or not to brew, that would be a stupid question !
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Re: Ordinary English Bitter

Unread postby BrauTim » Mon Jun 23, 2014 2:41 pm

Jackson wrote:Thanks for posting.nwas looking at doing a similar OG beer at some point but thought there was a lower limit on the amount of grain you can use in the BM, is this the case?


I'm not sure what the lower limit would be, I had 8.2kg in the 50L malt pipe and will need to go lower next time to achieve 3.7% abv.
To brew or not to brew, that would be a stupid question !
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Re: Ordinary English Bitter

Unread postby Dicko » Mon Jun 23, 2014 3:04 pm

BrauTim wrote:
Dicko wrote:Thanks for posting BT.
The "steep" addition of goldings hop at the end of the boil has me wondering.
It is an 81 gramm addition, and do you add it at flame out and hold the wort hot for a certain time?
I tend to add a steep addition by cooling the wort to 80 deg c then adding the hops and hold the wort at 80 deg for a nominated time, usually 20 minutes and then continue chilling.
By doing it this way Beersmith calculates the IBU effect it has on the overall bitterness.
I would appreciate what method you use?

:cheers:


I'm glad you posted this question Dicko because I'd forgotten this tiny but important detail. Just as you do I cooled the wort to 80C then added my hops for a steep, I didn't maintain the temp and just let the wort slowly cool for 30mins before starting my chiller again which ran for about another 25 mins.

I don't pay absolute attention to beersmith because there are too many variables for beersmith to handle including water chemistry. I use beersmith mainly as a guide, so the IBU's may not be exact but taste wise I'd say they are in range.

Also bear in mind that it may take 2 months for me to drink this batch and hop flavour, aroma and bitterness perception may diminish as aroma fades (assuming it will fade).


Yes BT I agree that Beersmith is only a guide when it comes to IBU's.
Thank you for your answer as I will know what you did and be able to assess your results as a bit of a guide for myself.
I always stick to the same procedure for adding hops at whirlpool so that my assessment will remain basically the same for each brew.
I will let you know how I go with your recipe as soon as I can get to brew it. :cheers:
The worst thing that can happen if I die is that my wife will sell all my brewing equipment for what I told her I paid for it
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Re: Ordinary English Bitter

Unread postby Dicko » Mon Jun 23, 2014 11:54 pm

Dicko wrote:Thanks for posting BT.
The "steep" addition of goldings hop at the end of the boil has me wondering.
It is an 81 gramm addition, and do you add it at flame out and hold the wort hot for a certain time?
I tend to add a steep addition by cooling the wort to 80 deg c then adding the hops and hold the wort at 80 deg for a nominated time, usually 20 minutes and then continue chilling.
By doing it this way Beersmith calculates the IBU effect it has on the overall bitterness.
I would appreciate what method you use?

:cheers:


I have overstated the steep time...I usually do it for 10 minutes, I will edit the above post now I have quoted the original post.
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