Mash method for a stout/porter?

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RE: Mash method for a stout/porter?

Unread postby cpa4ny » Tue Feb 18, 2014 10:04 am

Beerkench wrote:
With this method, do you include the speciality malts in your Ph estimation, or do they not have enough time to affect the mash Ph?



No - I calculate my "salts" & phosphoric acid additions to get to my target pH excluding the roasted grains.

Reason being that by the time I add roasted and/or crystal grains (last 10-15 minutes of the mash-out @ ~77C), my main mash has already converted.

For roasted (a/k/a highly-kilned) & crystal grains - there is nothing to convert - you just rinse off the color / sugar (respectively) directly into the converted main wort.

My water happens to have very low alkalinity, so any substantial amount of black patent malt will wreak havoc with my pH if I were to add it in the beginning.

However, if your water has high alkalinity - adding roasted grains from the get-go may work for you. YMMV :beer:

One more method that Gordon Strong recommends is to cold-steep roasted grains overnight to minimize any potential acridity; however, I am yet to try this.

I don't brew porters/stouts very often :-)
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RE: Mash method for a stout/porter?

Unread postby BrauTim » Tue Feb 18, 2014 1:07 pm

cpa4ny wrote:
One more method that Gordon Strong recommends is to cold-steep roasted grains overnight to minimize any potential acridity; however, I am yet to try this.



I tried this on my last ordinary bitter after reading that part in GS's book, I steeped some black malt for 24 hours before brewday in a cafetiere, and chucked it into the boil for the last 15 mins, it works! Only problem was that I believe my yeast was infected with acetobacter and I ended up ditching the brew, however the colour looked to be spot on for a bitter.

It was surprising how much 'dark matter' you can get out of so little black malt!

Next time I'll try adding it with less than 30 mins to go in the mash to see what happens there, also I don't believe there is an issue with crystal malts and astringency, the late mash/steeping method only really applies to roasted malts. Although as someone has mentioned - keeping non-diastatic malts back until towards the end for convenience and avoiding stuck mashes when the malt pipe is rammed is an excellent idea.

It's interesting to note what the effect on pH might be as pH changes throughout the mash, boiling and fermenting processes and needs to be 'within range' when going into the fermenter, might be worth taking measurements at all stages to see what the effects are.

:cheers:
Last edited by BrauTim on Tue Feb 18, 2014 1:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Mash method for a stout/porter?

Unread postby cpa4ny » Wed Feb 19, 2014 1:35 am

BrauTim wrote:
I steeped some black malt for 24 hours before brewday in a cafetiere, and chucked it into the boil for the last 15 mins, it works!



Cool - thanks for sharing! :beer:


BrauTim wrote:
It's interesting to note what the effect on pH might be as pH changes throughout the mash, boiling and fermenting processes and needs to be 'within range' when going into the fermenter, might be worth taking measurements at all stages to see what the effects are.



During my pH meter's "virgin run" I concentrated solely on getting the wort pH right; however - you are absolutely right that further measurements have to be taken all along the process. For my brew this coming Sunday, I'll be monitoring boil pH & chilled wort pH as well. Great points! :cheers:
Last edited by cpa4ny on Wed Feb 19, 2014 1:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Mash method for a stout/porter?

Unread postby eli.donald » Tue May 12, 2015 12:10 pm

resurrecting an old thread as I have an interest.

I'm about to do a milk stout - so I want it to be sweet ( I use lactose sugar as well), also I use oats in the recipe as I like it to have a full body and mouth feel...

So how would folk recommend a newbie to stepped mashes treats this one :D ?
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Re: Mash method for a stout/porter?

Unread postby Nesto » Tue May 12, 2015 10:04 pm

For stouts/porters I like keeping it simple. 10 mins at 40C to start, 60sih mins somewhere around 65-68C, mash out at 77 for 10 mins. The lactose won't ferment, but it's also is much less sweet than maltose - taste it and see.
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Re: Mash method for a stout/porter?

Unread postby eli.donald » Wed May 13, 2015 5:45 am

Do I need to think about anything in particular with the oats?
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Re: Mash method for a stout/porter?

Unread postby Nesto » Wed May 13, 2015 6:10 am

Flaked oats, nothing special needed, more info here: http://www.howtobrew.com/section2/chapter12-2.html

I do like to toast my flaked oats before using. I find it leaves a little more actual oat flavor in the beer. Toast at 150C until they are golden brown, then put in the mash with the rest of your grains.
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Re: Mash method for a stout/porter?

Unread postby Dicko » Wed May 13, 2015 10:22 am

If you are using flaked oats then just throw 'em in the mash...if you are using malted oats as a processed grain then you will need to crack the grains at a smaller mill gap setting and mash at a lower temperature to achieve conversion.

Have a read of this https://kenanddot.wordpress.com/2012/12 ... malt-beer/

And if you do a heap of research you will find a lots more info.

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Re: Mash method for a stout/porter?

Unread postby cpa4ny » Thu May 14, 2015 1:46 am

+1 on toasting the oats.

I know they are ready when the whole kitchen starts smelling like oatmeal cookies :cheers:
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