Overnight mashing

How to get most out of brewing with your Braumeister? Help others and share your tips/best practices.

RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby Dicko » Thu Mar 20, 2014 1:04 am

BrauTim wrote:How long is 'safe' to rest at mash out 78 C ? As the BM will hold there indefinitely waiting for the malt pipe to be removed.


That is how I have done it Brau Tim.

I do a normal mash to whatever your mash requirements are, after teatime, then when the mash is complete and it says to remove malt pipe, I click OK but leave the malt pipe in.
This stops the beeper from sounding all night.
The mash just sits on the mash out temp which has been set in the mash steps until you are out of bed and ready to go the next morning.
I lift the malt pipe and carry on with the brew procedure from there.
I was setting the mash out at 78 but I think I detected a bit of an astringency taste so now I set it to 76 and it seems to be OK.
I also notice an increase in mash efficiency doing it this way.

Cheers
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby cpa4ny » Thu Mar 20, 2014 1:13 am

Great ideas gentlemen - many thanks! :beer:
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby Cervantes » Thu Mar 20, 2014 2:40 am

Dicko wrote:
I do a normal mash to whatever your mash requirements are, after teatime, then when the mash is complete and it says to remove malt pipe, I click OK but leave the malt pipe in.
This stops the beeper from sounding all night.
The mash just sits on the mash out temp which has been set in the mash steps until you are out of bed and ready to go the next morning.
I lift the malt pipe and carry on with the brew procedure from there.
I was setting the mash out at 78 but I think I detected a bit of an astringency taste so now I set it to 76 and it seems to be OK.
I also notice an increase in mash efficiency doing it this way.

Cheers


This sounds like a plan.

I'll give this a try but will let mine run overnight though. It can bleep all it likes as it's in the shed and I won't hear it from the house.

Great ideas gents.

Cheers
Andy
Cheers :cheers:
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby Dicko » Thu Mar 20, 2014 4:09 am

Cervantes wrote:
Dicko wrote:
I do a normal mash to whatever your mash requirements are, after teatime, then when the mash is complete and it says to remove malt pipe, I click OK but leave the malt pipe in.
This stops the beeper from sounding all night.
The mash just sits on the mash out temp which has been set in the mash steps until you are out of bed and ready to go the next morning.
I lift the malt pipe and carry on with the brew procedure from there.
I was setting the mash out at 78 but I think I detected a bit of an astringency taste so now I set it to 76 and it seems to be OK.
I also notice an increase in mash efficiency doing it this way.

Cheers


This sounds like a plan.

I'll give this a try but will let mine run overnight though. It can bleep all it likes as it's in the shed and I won't hear it from the house.

Great ideas gents.

Cheers
Andy


Yes Andy, if you do that you can go to bed at any time and not worry about being up to press the button :cheers:
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Re: Overnight mashing

Unread postby BrauTim » Mon Apr 21, 2014 8:17 pm

As I reported on the Summer Saison thread, I performed a split brewday which was not an overnight mash, I've updated my procedure here:

I split this brew overnight to save some time & effort on each day. In the evening I prepped the water, milled grain etc, doughed-in and set the mash going, at the end of the mash and after mash-out at 78°C, the BM stops pumping and starts beeping, if you press the 'quit/enter' button then the BM will stop beeping waiting for you to remove the malt pipe and press the button to continue to the boil, whilst it is waiting for you to press the button the BM will cycle the heater elements to maintain mash-out temperature, it will not pump the wort.

At this point I pulled the malt pipe onto the stirrup, sparged with 2L water and let it drain for a bit. after 10-15 mins I pulled the malt pipe completely and let it drain into a bucket for another 15-20 mins and poured this into the BM and left the malt pipe draining overnight. I put the lid on the BM and covered it with an old padded jacket and a couple of towels to provide some insulation. This is where I stopped and went to bed, during which time the BM happily maintains wort temperature overnight.

In the morning I discarded what had drained into the bucket from the malt pipe (another 500ml) and pressed the button on the BM to set it going for the boil, I then just carried on with the rest of the brewday routine.

From doughing-in to going to bed was about 2.5 hours (it would be less without the extra mash steps I'd programmed) and in the morning was around 3 hours including wort chilling, clean up and packing away and overall it was more relaxing than a full brewday, I shall be doing this again as long as the beer turns out well :)


For those of us that work and need to leave the weekends free for activities other than brewing and you must get a brew-on or stocks will be running low or you will be suffering from brewing withdrawal symptoms, I am looking at the next split brewday option.

This would be to repeat the above procedure, but hold the wort at mash-out temp of 78°C (or lower if possible) for between 18-20 hours, this would allow you to split the brew over two evenings, with a nights sleep and a day's work in between.

I will be having a go at this on my next brew in a few weeks, however there are a couple of questions I have:

  • Does anyone know if there could be a detrimental effect of holding the wort at 78°C for up to 20 hours?
  • And what is a safe temperature that the wort could be lowered to that would not invite any kind of bacterial infection? (note: I haven't checked if a lower temperature step could be programmed following mash-out temperature, the BM may not allow this anyway).
To brew or not to brew, that would be a stupid question !
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Re: Overnight mashing

Unread postby cpa4ny » Tue Apr 22, 2014 12:52 am

78C with pH of ~5.2 doesn't sound like a hospitable environment for bacteria.

Wonder if 20 hours @ 78C may extract some tannins from the grains though...

Do you plan to take the malt pipe out?
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Re: Overnight mashing

Unread postby Batz » Tue Apr 22, 2014 10:31 am

Power must be somewhat less expensive in Singapore than Australia, 20hr mash will have that meter whizzing here.
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Re: Overnight mashing

Unread postby cpa4ny » Tue Apr 22, 2014 10:41 am

Batz wrote:Power must be somewhat less expensive in Singapore than Australia, 20hr mash will have that meter whizzing here.


I was replying to BrauTim's comments.

Power is actually quite pricy here as well.

Personally, overnight is probably the longest I envisage myself keeping my BM turned on.
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Re: Overnight mashing

Unread postby BrauTim » Tue Apr 22, 2014 2:24 pm

cpa4ny wrote:78C with pH of ~5.2 doesn't sound like a hospitable environment for bacteria.

Wonder if 20 hours @ 78C may extract some tannins from the grains though...

Do you plan to take the malt pipe out?



Yes, the malt pipe has been pulled.

As for electricity use, I think a complete brewday costs about £0.20 so even if it was double that to maintain a well insulated BM for 20 hours, it's still cheap enough.
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Re: Overnight mashing

Unread postby Dicko » Tue Apr 22, 2014 7:13 pm

Batz wrote:Power must be somewhat less expensive in Singapore than Australia, 20hr mash will have that meter whizzing here.


I hate spending money on power but I have actually watched the PID light when my BM has been in this "waiting" mode and I note that it only flicks on for about a second every so often.
This to me, indicates that it may be using very little power while it is only maintaining the set temperature.
When ramping temps and boiling then it will be like any other electric element of the same energy value in your home eg. Electric kettle.
As stated, insulation on the kettle will help to keep the power consumption down as well.

All the above noted I don't think that I will ever personally have a need to hold temps for 20 hours but it is good to know you can do it if you need to. :cheers:
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Re: Overnight mashing

Unread postby BrauTim » Tue Apr 22, 2014 8:35 pm

Dicko wrote:
Batz wrote:All the above noted I don't think that I will ever personally have a need to hold temps for 20 hours but it is good to know you can do it if you need to. :cheers:


My main reason for attempting this is that it will give me complete freedom to brew during the working week if I need to, during the winter it's not too much of a problem brewing on a weekend day as there are not as many 'activities' planned. But as soon as spring begins then the world comes alive and weekends start to become booked to do things other than brewing, we lead a very outdoor lifestyle during the warmer months and tend to make the most of it: the gardening, do those outdoor DIY jobs that couldn't be done during the winter, go on weekend breaks to the coast, go on holidays, go on motorcycle trips, go to beer festivals, invites to more BBQ's etc etc, so brew weekends become harder to plan-in, especially during the Summer months.

Before you know it, you could be running low on stocks and I only brew once a month on average. This is also another method of increasing the number of brewdays throughout the year without encroaching on more family time!
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Re: Overnight mashing

Unread postby Dicko » Tue Apr 22, 2014 9:12 pm

I am self employed and quite often I work only until lunchtime. This means I lose the afternoon time unless I start the brew before I go and finish it when I get home.
The BM is a great tool for being able to mash when you are not there and the mash program flexibility allows you to do a brew in almost any situation.
There is some great ideas above to suit many differing situations. :cheers:
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Re: RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby Cervantes » Sat Apr 26, 2014 8:24 am

Sorry - Post Deleted.

I got confused and missed some pages............... :oops:

Nothing to see here. Please move along.
Cheers :cheers:
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Re: Overnight mashing

Unread postby zlander » Sun May 04, 2014 6:42 am

Thanks to this topic, I had a go at overnight mashing yesterday.
Mashing schedule :

15,0 C 60 min
15,0 C 180 min
40,0 C 30 min
66,0 C 180 min
77,0 C 10 min

When I came around in the morning, there was somethink like 2 litres of wort spiled on the table.. After checking pumps for leckeage and few minutes of total confusion, I figured it must have been wort channeling happening at some stage that caused spilling.
All in all, no biggie, efficiency was only one point below expected(as I put in more sparge water than expected).
What I did notice is that wort is not as clear as normaly. But then again it is new recipe with 0.75kg of wheat malt, so this might be the reason.
All in all, really happy with this option. Without it, woundt be able to brew this time.

:beer:
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Re: Overnight mashing

Unread postby whitegoose » Tue May 06, 2014 4:35 am

So does anybody have any reports of negative outcomes from overnight mashing? Any off flavours or problems with the end product?
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