Overnight mashing

How to get most out of brewing with your Braumeister? Help others and share your tips/best practices.

RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby Dicko » Tue Feb 18, 2014 10:11 pm

Twonky wrote:EMailed with Speidel today, and their response was:

About the setting of the start time for the next day
we had discussed this some years ago.

The problem is that it is not conform to legal aspects
to start the unit running without being in the near of it
for a longer time


Okay too bad.....
:cheers:


To quote Monty Python.....well that's that then!! :D
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby eviljason » Fri Feb 21, 2014 3:44 pm

I guess my big question here is how much do you lose to evaporation by holding at 76c overnight.
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby niels » Fri Feb 21, 2014 7:44 pm

eviljason wrote:I guess my big question here is how much do you lose to evaporation by holding at 76c overnight.

During the mash you can keep the lid on. This way I don't think you will lose a lot by evaporation.

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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby cpa4ny » Mon Feb 24, 2014 5:27 am

I would say one has to keep the lid on, otherwise the temps would drop very quickly and all enzymatic activity would be in disarray.
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby BrauTim » Mon Feb 24, 2014 9:20 am

cpa4ny wrote:I would say one has to keep the lid on, otherwise the temps would drop very quickly and all enzymatic activity would be in disarray.


I agree with keeping the lid on to prevent evaporation, at mash out temp Alpha & Beta amylaze have been denatured, so all enzymatic activity has stopped and a drop in temperature would not affect this. I'm not sure of any other effects that a drop in temp may have on the mash, if any.

Regardless of keeping the lid on or not, the BM would maintain temperature itself by pumping and heating!
Last edited by BrauTim on Mon Feb 24, 2014 9:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby cpa4ny » Mon Feb 24, 2014 9:29 am

BrauTim wrote:
...all the enzymes have been denatured, so all enzymatic activity has stopped...



Ah, fair enough - we are talking mash-out temps here. :beer:
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby Cervantes » Thu Feb 27, 2014 11:36 pm

Would this be plausible?

Fill your BM with cold water and put in your malt.

If you're only doing a two or three step mash you could set the first two steps to be 20 degrees for four hours then another 20 degrees for four hours and then into your proper mash schedule.

That way the malt is soaking at 20 degrees overnight rather than sitting at mash out temps, but the mash is still ready for sparging and boiling in the morning.


Cheers
Andy
Last edited by Cervantes on Thu Feb 27, 2014 11:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Cheers :cheers:
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby dinnerstick » Fri Feb 28, 2014 7:15 am

Cervantes wrote:Would this be plausible?

Fill your BM with cold water and put in your malt.

If you're only doing a two or three step mash you could set the first two steps to be 20 degrees for four hours then another 20 degrees for four hours and then into your proper mash schedule.

That way the malt is soaking at 20 degrees overnight rather than sitting at mash out temps, but the mash is still ready for sparging and boiling in the morning.


Cheers
Andy


that's an interesting one, does anyone know (in theory or in practice) what the effect of a hours-long 20 deg rest would be?
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby Cervantes » Fri Feb 28, 2014 7:31 am

I'd imagine that at such a low temperature not many enzymes are active, so probably not a lot of effect.

But that is a very uneducated guess.

I'd be interested to hear from those who know more.

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Andy
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby Krmak » Wed Mar 05, 2014 9:34 pm

I haven't tried it, but I think you would start souring your wort if left for an extended time at 20 degrees.
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby dinnerstick » Wed Mar 05, 2014 10:35 pm

a few (~8) hours? lacto is pretty slow at that temp i think; it likes high 30's. will lacto ferment the big carbohydrates in pre-mash malt? i'm really not sure. my concern is more if the enzymes will retain peak activity; proteases (endogenous or from bacteria) could start to attack those important proteins (amylases)...? again i don't know i'm just thinking what might go wrong. someone needs to test it!
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby fy0d0r » Wed Mar 12, 2014 11:04 am

I'm planning to do a Hefeweizen this Friday.
Will do overnight Mash with the following schedule:
20C 240 min
45C 20 min
50C 10 min
66C 240 min
72C 60 min

Done my previous APA with overnight mash with three 3-hour rests at 65, 66 and 67 with no issues.
Last edited by fy0d0r on Wed Mar 12, 2014 11:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby BrauTim » Wed Mar 12, 2014 10:29 pm

fy0d0r wrote:I'm planning to do a Hefeweizen this Friday.
Will do overnight Mash with the following schedule:
20C 240 min
45C 20 min
50C 10 min
66C 240 min
72C 60 min

Done my previous APA with overnight mash with three 3-hour rests at 65, 66 and 67 with no issues.


Interesting, I suppose once the mash has completely converted then an additional 2.5 hours at 66 C will not make much difference? Is 240 mins the max you can program for a single step?
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby fy0d0r » Thu Mar 13, 2014 5:22 am

240 min in the max step time as far as I remember.
Longer rests are to bring the overall mash time to 9-10 hours to have a decent Friday sleep not getting up in the middle of the night to brew beer :-)
Last edited by fy0d0r on Thu Mar 13, 2014 5:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
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RE: Overnight mashing

Unread postby cpa4ny » Thu Mar 13, 2014 6:31 am

Brilliant idea Fyodor.

I believe it should work; 20C is still far enough from the phytase range, which runs between 30C-53C, 35C being peak.

So I assume that even though the mash sits @ 20C for 4 hours, it shouldn't start dropping the pH.

Look forward to hearing about your results :beer:
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