beer line length

How to get most out of brewing with your Braumeister? Help others and share your tips/best practices.

beer line length

Unread postby Onthebrew » Tue Oct 09, 2018 9:48 am

What is the optimum length for a beer line from keg to tap. i currently have a couple of party tap options - one thats 3/8 i think and about a meter and a half, and another that's a short bit of 3/8 into a couple of meters of 1/8 then back to 3/8. However with both i seem to just get foam all the time.

Only thing that works for me is a tap directly attached to the beer out disconnect- it takes a bit of a knack to avoid foam here too, but once you get used to it, just by opening it a fraction you can get a decent pint with just the right amount of head. Its a basic tap and i thought the beer line was supposed to be a better solution but all i am getting from it is foam.

Any ideas?

The beer is eat around 2C and carbonated to 2.6 ( normally a week at 12 psi). i like beers with a decent carbonation
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Re: beer line length

Unread postby john.donovan62 » Tue Oct 09, 2018 10:25 am

https://brucrafter.com/beer-line-calcul ... Calculator
Hi OTB, check out brucrafter site. A handy calculator and then some good explanatory text about the different factors.
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Re: beer line length

Unread postby Onthebrew » Tue Oct 09, 2018 10:33 am

cheers will have a read of that. a quick check infomed me it needs to be 110 foot for 3/16 line???
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Re: beer line length

Unread postby john.donovan62 » Tue Oct 09, 2018 10:51 am

No, that is for 3/8". For a 3/16" beer line you will need 8 feet if there is a 1 foot rise from middle of keg to tap.
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Re: beer line length

Unread postby Onthebrew » Tue Oct 09, 2018 11:03 am

yes, my mistake just realised that. will go for 8 feet then. a good tip on that site was making sure the beer line is same temp as keg- will store the lines in the fridge from now on.

Think my party tap has 3/8 into 3/16 and back to 3/8- i guess its just the length of the 3/18 i need to worry about.

not sure what my other beer line is- thinking it may be 3/8 as fits the disconnect.
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Re: beer line length

Unread postby tsgreen » Tue Oct 09, 2018 11:17 am

Great info!
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beer line length

Unread postby f00b4r » Tue Oct 09, 2018 3:09 pm

john.donovan62 wrote:https://brucrafter.com/beer-line-calculator/#Beer_Line_Calculator
Hi OTB, check out brucrafter site. A handy calculator and then some good explanatory text about the different factors.


That site caters for Americans, who measure beer line by inner diameter, whereas the op is based in the UK, who measure beer line by the outer diameter. 3/16" beer line means very different things depending on where you are from
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Re: beer line length

Unread postby IPA » Wed Oct 10, 2018 7:23 am

Over carbonation is the the sole cause of fobbing. Online carbonation calculators are a waste of time and are designed primarily for bottled American beer. I have, in the past, had problems with fobbing and tried all of those stupid beer line calculators. Now I use 60cm long 7 mm beer line and it works perfectly. Why ? because I prime all of my beers, after they reach terminal gravity, with 2.5 grams a litre of sugar. That is with one exception. When using Whitelab Kolsch yeast it needs for some strange reason to be 3 grams a litre. Follow this advice and you with solve the problem. Beware though the beer must have reached terminal gravity not a figure calculated by yet another online calculator.
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Re: beer line length

Unread postby Onthebrew » Wed Oct 10, 2018 12:00 pm

IPA wrote:Over carbonation is the the sole cause of fobbing. Online carbonation calculators are a waste of time and are designed primarily for bottled American beer. I have, in the past, had problems with fobbing and tried all of those stupid beer line calculators. Now I use 60cm long 7 mm beer line and it works perfectly. Why ? because I prime all of my beers, after they reach terminal gravity, with 2.5 grams a litre of sugar. That is with one exception. When using Whitelab Kolsch yeast it needs for some strange reason to be 3 grams a litre. Follow this advice and you with solve the problem. Beware though the beer must have reached terminal gravity not a figure calculated by yet another online calculator.


i wouldn't want the beers carbonated any less as i prefer the american carb levels- aiming for 2.5/2.6 usually. What sort of carbonation are you getting with your system? do you not use CO2 to carbonate at all?

i should be fine with terminal gravity because it sits in the FV for a minimum of two weeks, usually nearer three.
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Re: beer line length

Unread postby Onthebrew » Wed Oct 10, 2018 12:02 pm

f00b4r wrote:
john.donovan62 wrote:https://brucrafter.com/beer-line-calculator/#Beer_Line_Calculator
Hi OTB, check out brucrafter site. A handy calculator and then some good explanatory text about the different factors.


That site caters for Americans, who measure beer line by inner diameter, whereas the op is based in the UK, who measure beer line by the outer diameter. 3/16" beer line means very different things depending on where you are from


do you know of a UK focused calculator?
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Re: beer line length

Unread postby IPA » Thu Oct 11, 2018 6:30 am

Onthebrew wrote:
IPA wrote:Over carbonation is the the sole cause of fobbing. Online carbonation calculators are a waste of time and are designed primarily for bottled American beer. I have, in the past, had problems with fobbing and tried all of those stupid beer line calculators. Now I use 60cm long 7 mm beer line and it works perfectly. Why ? because I prime all of my beers, after they reach terminal gravity, with 2.5 grams a litre of sugar. That is with one exception. When using Whitelab Kolsch yeast it needs for some strange reason to be 3 grams a litre. Follow this advice and you with solve the problem. Beware though the beer must have reached terminal gravity not a figure calculated by yet another online calculator.


i wouldn't want the beers carbonated any less as i prefer the american carb levels- aiming for 2.5/2.6 usually. What sort of carbonation are you getting with your system? do you not use CO2 to carbonate at all?

i should be fine with terminal gravity because it sits in the FV for a minimum of two weeks, usually nearer three.


I don't use CO2 to carbonate only to serve after initial pressure has dropped. I also use a float device which ensures I get extremely bright beer from start to finish.
Look at commercial bottled beer and note the carbonation level it is quite low. When you open a bottle there is only a slight hiss. As opposed to most home brewed beer which gives a loud pop and sometimes a gush of foam.
Some commercial brewers supply glasses with an engraved logo on the inside bottom of them which provides nucleation points to release the absorbed CO2 in a stream of bubble giving the impression of high carbonation.
I you are determined to follow carbonation charts my advice is to bottle your beer and serve it at near freezing temperatures.
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Re: beer line length

Unread postby Onthebrew » Fri Oct 12, 2018 8:57 am

IPA wrote:
Onthebrew wrote:
IPA wrote:Over carbonation is the the sole cause of fobbing. Online carbonation calculators are a waste of time and are designed primarily for bottled American beer. I have, in the past, had problems with fobbing and tried all of those stupid beer line calculators. Now I use 60cm long 7 mm beer line and it works perfectly. Why ? because I prime all of my beers, after they reach terminal gravity, with 2.5 grams a litre of sugar. That is with one exception. When using Whitelab Kolsch yeast it needs for some strange reason to be 3 grams a litre. Follow this advice and you with solve the problem. Beware though the beer must have reached terminal gravity not a figure calculated by yet another online calculator.


i wouldn't want the beers carbonated any less as i prefer the american carb levels- aiming for 2.5/2.6 usually. What sort of carbonation are you getting with your system? do you not use CO2 to carbonate at all?

i should be fine with terminal gravity because it sits in the FV for a minimum of two weeks, usually nearer three.


I don't use CO2 to carbonate only to serve after initial pressure has dropped. I also use a float device which ensures I get extremely bright beer from start to finish.
Look at commercial bottled beer and note the carbonation level it is quite low. When you open a bottle there is only a slight hiss. As opposed to most home brewed beer which gives a loud pop and sometimes a gush of foam.
Some commercial brewers supply glasses with an engraved logo on the inside bottom of them which provides nucleation points to release the absorbed CO2 in a stream of bubble giving the impression of high carbonation.
I you are determined to follow carbonation charts my advice is to bottle your beer and serve it at near freezing temperatures.


Just because they don’t pop doesn’t mean they are not well carbonated. Bottles of Tim Taylor and spitfire etc don’t pop but are much more carbonated than draft in pubs. Also wheat beers such us erdinger are highly carbonated, much than your average bottled home brew ale but they don’t pop either.
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Re: beer line length

Unread postby IPA » Fri Oct 12, 2018 12:05 pm

Try my method. There is an old saying. " You can give somebody all the information but you can't make them learn" For the record I brew an almost exact clone of Sheps Spitfire using a forty year old sample of their yeast and I follow the method outlined. It has the same perceived cabonation, conducted in blind tastings by friends, as the commercial product. The yeast I recovered from a forty year old bottle of Sheps beer.
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Re: beer line length

Unread postby Onthebrew » Mon Oct 15, 2018 12:25 pm

Are we talking the draught commercial product or the bottle- The bottle i believe is around 2.5, draught much less.

Either way care to share the recipe :D
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Re: beer line length

Unread postby IPA » Tue Oct 16, 2018 5:06 pm

[quote="Onthebrew"]Are we talking the draught commercial product or the bottle- The bottle i believe is around 2.5, draught much less.

Either way care to share the recipe :D[/quote

SHEPHERD AND NEAME SPITFIRE
25 litres efficiency 85%

Pale malt 3749 grs
Amber malt 250 grs
Crystal malt 400 grs
Wheat malt 200 grs
Torrified wheat 400 grs

Target 29 grs 90 mins
Golding 14 grs 90 mins
Golding 10 grs 15 mins

ABV 4.9%
EBU 50
EBC 32

ENJOY
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