Sparging with the Braumeister

How to get most out of brewing with your Braumeister? Help others and share your tips/best practices.

Re: Sparging with the Braumeister

Unread postby BrauTim » Fri Sep 12, 2014 12:31 pm

Luis Coentrao wrote:+1

Also, for the enthusiastics of high gravity beers, a cold rinse of the grains would be interesting for a double mash procedure. After alfa-rest at 70C of the "first round", it would be possible to lower the temperature of the mash (depending on the amount of rinse water and its temperature) to start the "second round" betwen protein-rest and beta-rest temperatures.

What do you think guys?


This could work especially if you mash at 67c then rinse cooler you won't have denatured any sacch enzymes. Could be worth an experiment vs a long mash period.
To brew or not to brew, that would be a stupid question !
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Re: Sparging with the Braumeister

Unread postby Luis Coentrao » Fri Sep 12, 2014 1:17 pm

This could work especially if you mash at 67c then rinse cooler you won't have denatured any sacch enzymes. Could be worth an experiment vs a long mash period.


Hi Tim,
I don't see a problem if you decide to finish the "1st round" double mash at 70C.
After, in the "2nd round", you'll add fresh malt with a lot of enzymes "hungry" of starch.
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Re: Sparging with the Braumeister

Unread postby BrauTim » Fri Sep 12, 2014 2:18 pm

Luis Coentrao wrote:
This could work especially if you mash at 67c then rinse cooler you won't have denatured any sacch enzymes. Could be worth an experiment vs a long mash period.


Hi Tim,
I don't see a problem if you decide to finish the "1st round" double mash at 70C.
After, in the "2nd round", you'll add fresh malt with a lot of enzymes "hungry" of starch.


Yes, quite correct :D
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Re: Sparging with the Braumeister

Unread postby DWP » Wed Sep 17, 2014 11:44 pm

I have been using my BM for a few years now and up until 3 months ago I was just rinsing the grains through the malt pipe after lifting it out after mash out @ 78c. I now have a seperate lauter tun that I use for either a Batch Sparge or a continuous Fly Sparge, depending on how much time I have.

Since then I have seen a 5% increase in my efficiency and my preboil gravity and volumes are right on target to achieve my boil off, final volume and gravity :D

Yes its alot more effort but I like the hands on part preboil after letting the machine run without any assistance for the mash cycle.

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Lauter Tun - 20Lt Handy Pail with Fittings


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Lauter filled with Sparge water before a Batch Sparge


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Fly Sparging
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Re: Sparging with the Braumeister

Unread postby cpa4ny » Thu Sep 18, 2014 2:02 am

Luis Coentrao wrote:+1

Also, for the enthusiastics of high gravity beers, a cold rinse of the grains would be interesting for a double mash procedure. After alfa-rest at 70C of the "first round", it would be possible to lower the temperature of the mash (depending on the amount of rinse water and its temperature) to start the "second round" betwen protein-rest and beta-rest temperatures.

What do you think guys?


I personally don't step-mash the double mashes (apologies if that sounded a bit convoluted).

I.e. I would go with a single infusion for both mashes to keep things more straight-forward.

I would mash-out though after the second mash, raising the grain bed temp to 77C.
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Re: Sparging with the Braumeister

Unread postby steak » Thu Feb 25, 2016 8:58 am

Best way to sparge with the Braumeister is to install it next to a tap with hot water, ideally a shower.
That gives you both advantages: not having to warm water up and not increasing the time to reach a boil.
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Re: Sparging with the Braumeister

Unread postby mashy » Thu Feb 25, 2016 9:27 am

I don't sparge. But I do wonder if mashing longer might achieve the same.
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Re: Sparging with the Braumeister

Unread postby ruirpaiva » Wed Aug 10, 2016 4:16 pm

I got this from the American Homebrewers Associatian:


Sparge Temperature

Ever since I started brewing, it has been taken as fact that using sparge water over 170° F (77° C) will extract harsh tannins from the grain and cause astringency in your beer. You still hear this frequently on forums and in books. But it seems to overlook one little thing: the decoction mash.

Decoction mashing has been around for centuries and is still used by some homebrewers today, many of whom win awards for beers made using the technique. Decoction mashing is done by removing a portion of the mash and boiling it before returning it to the mash tun. The last time I checked, boiling is hotter than 170° F (77° C)! So, why does this technique make award-winning beer instead of a harsh, astringent mess? Because of pH.

If the pH is low enough, any tannins you may extract will actually enhance flavor rather than cause harshness and astringency. The magic number seems to be a pH of 6. If you keep your pH well below that, the temperature of your sparge water really won’t matter. For the last 15 years I’ve been using sparge water in the 185–190° F (85–88° C) range and have no issues with tannins from the grain whatsoever. That’s because with my water supply and batch sparge technique, the pH of my grain stays well below 6, even without treating the sparge water with acid to lower the pH. Whether that exact method works for you will depend on your own water, although batch sparging does limit pH rise in the sparge. In traditional continuous (fly) sparging, you continually dilute the pH buffering ability of the grain, so it’s likely you’ll need to treat your water to maintain proper pH. Even in batch sparging, if you have extreme water, you may need to do some adjustment. But once you do, you have a lot more leeway with sparge temperature.

homebrew sparge

Another common misconception is that sparging with hotter water dilutes the sugar in the grain more, making it less viscous so it flows more easily and increases efficiency. Unfortunately, physics doesn’t seem to work like that. There’s a thing called the “limit of solubility,” which determines how much sugar can be dissolved in a liquid at a given temperature. Sugar solubility is not an issue in the mash or sparge. There is no solid sugar to be dissolved during the sparge, since the sugar is all in solution when it is created. The solubility of maltose in water at mash temperatures is about 66.7 % by weight (Maltose dissolves in water at a 2:1 ratio by weight—1 lb. maltose in 2 lb. water, 2 kg maltose in 4 kg water, and so on; reference), which is equivalent to a specific gravity (SG) in excess of 1.300. So unless the SG of your wort is over 1.300, there is no advantage to using hotter water to dissolve the sugars. Kai Troster has done experiments showing that even using cool (60° F/16° C) water to sparge will not adversely affect efficiency or beer quality, as has Ray Found of Brulosphy.com. I have also tested this repeatedly with the same results.

Some people have noted an increase in extraction by using hot sparge water and attributed it to the sugars being more soluble. In all likelihood, what they’re seeing is the last little bit of starch conversion happening due to the increased temperature. So, while sparging with hotter water may increase your efficiency, it’s not due to increased solubility. It’s due to increased conversion efficiency.

But let’s get real here. Aside from the curiosity of demonstrating that hot sparge water doesn’t matter, or as an emergency technique when for some reason you can’t heat the water, there’s no real advantage to using cool sparge water. You have to heat the wort to a boil anyway, and hotter water will get you there more quickly.


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Cheers,
Rui Paiva
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Re: Sparging with the Braumeister

Unread postby Elderberry » Wed Aug 31, 2016 12:56 pm

I've stopped heating my sparge water and now just do a steady rinse with tap water until I've reached my pre-boil volume. I do this with the malt pipe suspended. I usually get around 80% or more efficiency if I stir the mash once or twice between stages.
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Re: Sparging with the Braumeister

Unread postby mashy » Wed Aug 31, 2016 1:06 pm

Update time then. To sparge or not to sparge has also be a marmite question for BM owners.

I never used to sparge. I have now done a few brews now with sparging and I am happy it makes no discernible difference.

So I am rejoinigng the NO Sparge camp - theres no need IMO.
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Re: Sparging with the Braumeister

Unread postby Doingatun » Wed Aug 31, 2016 4:52 pm

mashy wrote:So I am rejoinigng the NO Sparge camp - theres no need IMO.


I can't make my mind up, keeping a foot in both camps :lol:

Lowest 76% efficiency no sparge 31L full volume mash. Highest 82% efficiency sparge 26L mash 5L 78c sparge
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Re: Sparging with the Braumeister

Unread postby valyb » Wed Aug 31, 2016 6:36 pm

Hi Doingatun,
I noticed that mash efficiency is affected by the grain amount.
Do you refer to the same recipe, same raw materials, same crushing parameters, same water,...
That can make a difference.
Cheers,
Valy ;-)
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Re: Sparging with the Braumeister

Unread postby Doingatun » Thu Sep 01, 2016 6:59 am

valyb wrote:Hi Doingatun,
I noticed that mash efficiency is affected by the grain amount.
Do you refer to the same recipe, same raw materials, same crushing parameters, same water,...
That can make a difference.


Hi valyb

The grains, water and crush are always the similar weight, wanting 4% abv, the only change I make is the hops
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