Cold crash

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mashy
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Cold crash

Unread post by mashy »

Just a thought.. How quick does it need to be? Or another way how quick is quick enough?

Is there any benefit to chilling quickly or is a prolonged cold crash better?

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squadricus
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Re: Cold crash

Unread post by squadricus »

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf ... .tb00495.x is worth a look. Temperature is discussed, but cooling rates that a homebrewer can manage are likely outside the range of industrial feasibility, so not considered.

Newton's law of cooling dictates a concave upward plot of temperature with time. In crystallization, slower initial cooling followed by more rapid cooling after a certain point, is beneficial for forming larger particles, which separate more readily. There might be similar dynamics at play in crashing yeast. The co-coagulation discussed in the article above kind of echoes with the practice of seeding in crystallization, although I don't expect many homebrewers to prep another yeast culture for this purpose. I wonder if dry yeast would be useful for this.

Good question, mate.
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aziztan
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Re: Cold crash

Unread post by aziztan »

The quicker the better to reduce the chances of infection. Lacto/ Pediococcus / Acetobactor can all operate at higher temps than brewers yeast. Therefore long cold crash times not only increases the chance of infection, by the fact that wild yeast and bacteria is all around us, it can also grow the number of the wild yeast/bacteria.

It really is a race to populate the beer first, because infection isn’t absolute and you can have varying degrees of infections. Take bottle bombs for example, perfectly ok beer on packaging but just enough wild yeast/bacteria lurking in there which might also have a higher alc tolerance, will attenuate the more complex longer chain sugars to throw out more Co2 than expected and voila, beer shower.

Doh! I had confused this with quick wort chilling!
Last edited by aziztan on Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:08 am, edited 1 time in total.

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squadricus
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Re: Cold crash

Unread post by squadricus »

aziztan, I think you're confusing wort chilling with cold crashing.
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Erick
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Re: Cold crash

Unread post by Erick »

This must be an interesting article for you, Mashy:
http://brulosophy.com/2019/07/29/cold-c ... t-results/

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mashy
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Re: Cold crash

Unread post by mashy »

Thanks guys really appreciate it. Did some searching and found nothing.

The reason for the question was I freeze grape pulp for winemaking, and did a lot of work to get that right... So wondered if the same applied to beer?

I currently run 2 weeks primary ferment. Then rack to a secondary with liitle/no headspace. This then goes into a fridge set at 3c

Is this best? I could :
A. Omit this step go straight to bottling.
B. Continue
C. Crash it faster in a freezer for a few hours.
Last edited by mashy on Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Erick
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Re: Cold crash

Unread post by Erick »

Jeez...
Isn't there a winemakersforum somewhere?
Personally I don't come near that stuff.

However, I would say that wine don't need to be as clear as beer, so i would skip that step
(and skip winemaking altogether) :twisted:

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mashy
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Re: Cold crash

Unread post by mashy »

Your link was excellent.
To be clear. I have done the work for winemaking.

What I have learnt (winemaking) made me wonder about the steps in cold crashing beer.

Vladimir
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Re: Cold crash

Unread post by Vladimir »

I guess this is a topic with no simple answer. Many brewers (both home- and pro) claim that you should cold crash slowly in order to not stress the yeast. On the other hand, many do cold crash as fast as possible without any negative effect. Personally, I don't believe it makes any difference. At least not at homebrewing level :beer:

Onthebrew
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Re: Cold crash

Unread post by Onthebrew »

is is going into a keg Mashy> if so can it not cold crash there to save the extra step? that,s what i do at the moment but that's more to do with lazyness!

i also i think i read the pressure change with a quick cold crash can suck in oxygen and all you star san or whatever from the bubbler.

i was thinking about a cold crash myself for one i have at the moment where i forgot the kettle finings- but as its going to have loads of dry hops i might just treat it as an intended cloudy beer!

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