BM + Boiler

Any discussion about non-specific Braumeister brewing techniques can be discussed here. E.g. "How to make a starter?", "What's the best way to store my grains?", "Which pH meter do you recommend?", ...

BM + Boiler

Unread postby Cervantes » Fri May 23, 2014 10:05 am

Has anyone considered using a boiler/kettle in conjunction with their BM?

Sometimes (Nearly always) I have limited time available to brew.

I was thinking that If I used the BM for the mash, I could then transfer the wort to a boiler for the boil, give the BM a quick rinse, and then start a second batch in the BM whilst the first batch is boiling.

I reckon that if I did this I could could make two different beers in one session.

Would a 30 litre Birko like this one provide a good enough boil without the lid on?

Or would I be better off getting a stainless steel pot or keg and fitting it with an element and tap?
Cheers :cheers:
Andy
User avatar
Cervantes
 
Posts: 475
Joined: Thu Feb 27, 2014 11:54 am
Location: Cervantes, Western Australia
Model: 20 litres

Re: BM + Boiler

Unread postby niels » Fri May 23, 2014 11:21 am

It is certainly a way of making two beers on the same day by using a different vessel to boil the first mash.

Regarding your question about the boiler/kettle: I don't see any information about temperature or wattage in the description. If you are sure this have enough power to bring ~20 liters to a boil then it certainly is a good option. Another drawback might be a thermostat controller that switches off the power before it reaches boiling temperatures. If so, you need to bypass it (and that is potentially dangerous if you don't stand by the kettle the whole boiling time).

Another remark: the heating element might cause scorching of the wort depending on the size/power ratio. This isn't necessarily a bad thing but might cause some caramelization that is unwanted in some beers. I'm saying this because there are people brewing in a "Weck" kettle and they are always warned for this.

weck.jpg
Weck kettle - 27 litres
weck.jpg (19.57 KiB) Viewed 576 times


Another option might be using a big SS pot on a kitchen stove or a portable stove (maybe even induction).

electric_stove.jpg
Portable electrical stove
induction_plate.jpg
Portable induction plate


Niels
User avatar
niels
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1056
Joined: Mon Dec 02, 2013 8:08 pm
Location: Belgium
Model: 50 litres

Re: BM + Boiler

Unread postby Cervantes » Fri May 23, 2014 11:48 am

Niels,

I was just thinking that maybe a pot and gas ring may be the way to go for me.

I brew in the garage anyway, so the gas wouldn't be a problem, but two big heating elements on the go at the same time (or even three as I have a small 10L boiler that use to heat sparge/rinse water) may overload the electricity supply to the garage.
Cheers :cheers:
Andy
User avatar
Cervantes
 
Posts: 475
Joined: Thu Feb 27, 2014 11:54 am
Location: Cervantes, Western Australia
Model: 20 litres

Re: BM + Boiler

Unread postby niels » Fri May 23, 2014 1:06 pm

Cervantes wrote:I was just thinking that maybe a pot and gas ring may be the way to go for me.

I brew in the garage anyway, so the gas wouldn't be a problem, but two big heating elements on the go at the same time (or even three as I have a small 10L boiler that use to heat sparge/rinse water) may overload the electricity supply to the garage.

I wasn't suggesting the gas option as not everyone brews in a well ventilated space. That's one of the main reasons to go electric.

I do brew in the garage too (and hopefully a dedicated brew shed after this summer) and I use a gas ring with a 100L stainless steel pot to boil my water in advance of brewing (because we do have very hard water). If I ever decide to have a crazy double brewday I will be using that setup to boil too.

Niels
User avatar
niels
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1056
Joined: Mon Dec 02, 2013 8:08 pm
Location: Belgium
Model: 50 litres

Re: BM + Boiler

Unread postby BrauTim » Fri May 23, 2014 8:29 pm

I have a 70L stainless pot on gas from my old 3v setup, I used it for a wheat beer decoction recently, probably the cheapest and easiest way to go.
To brew or not to brew, that would be a stupid question !
User avatar
BrauTim
 
Posts: 540
Joined: Sun Feb 02, 2014 1:03 pm
Location: England
Model: 50 litres

Re: BM + Boiler

Unread postby Cervantes » Fri May 23, 2014 10:26 pm

How's this for an option...........

Just have to fit a tap and get a gas burner.

Palmer seems to think that aluminium is okay for brew kettles. Does anyone else know why it may not be suitable?
Cheers :cheers:
Andy
User avatar
Cervantes
 
Posts: 475
Joined: Thu Feb 27, 2014 11:54 am
Location: Cervantes, Western Australia
Model: 20 litres

Re: BM + Boiler

Unread postby Dicko » Fri May 23, 2014 10:39 pm

My first brewery utilised Aluminium pots and they were fine for the HLT but as a kettle and mash tun they soon become stained and they are extremely hard to clean.
If I were to do what you are doing I would buy stainless steel.
There are many cheaper stainless pots available now that are quite suitable for brewing.

:cheers:
The worst thing that can happen if I die is that my wife will sell all my brewing equipment for what I told her I paid for it
User avatar
Dicko
 
Posts: 1178
Joined: Tue Jan 21, 2014 8:25 pm
Location: Port Lincoln South Oz
Model: 20 litres

Re: BM + Boiler

Unread postby Cervantes » Sat May 24, 2014 2:41 am

Dicko,

Thanks for the advice.

That's what I like about the forums. Plenty of opportunities to learn from other peoples experience.

I've just managed to score a 50 litre keg to convert into a kettle, so will be going the gas ring and keggle route.
Cheers :cheers:
Andy
User avatar
Cervantes
 
Posts: 475
Joined: Thu Feb 27, 2014 11:54 am
Location: Cervantes, Western Australia
Model: 20 litres

Re: BM + Boiler

Unread postby niels » Sat May 24, 2014 5:02 am

Cervantes wrote:Palmer seems to think that aluminium is okay for brew kettles. Does anyone else know why it may not be suitable?

I don't like the use off aluminium for brewing as your brew is a tad acidic and aluminium is a soft metal. This might cause the pot to impart a bit of metal taste to the beer.

Also, I remember doing the dishes at the camps and weekends with the scouts. We used aluminium pots to cook and when scrubbing them your water becomes dark (and not because of the food leftovers). Your sponges would become almost black...

I don't have a very scientific explanation, but in de long run a stainless steel pot will be a better choice. It doesn't wear down and is easy to clean. You could opt for a single bottom pot instead of a layered bottom pot. This reduces de price of the pot, but you might get some scorching.

Another option is an email pot. As long as the coating is intact you're safe to go. Although as cracks start to appear or some coating is chipped away the steel underneath might start corroding and give a metallic taste to your beer.

Niels
User avatar
niels
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1056
Joined: Mon Dec 02, 2013 8:08 pm
Location: Belgium
Model: 50 litres


Return to General Brewing Discussions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest