Cider recommendations

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Cider recommendations

Unread postby niels » Wed Jan 28, 2015 9:06 am

My girlfriend went to a English shop last week and came home with a few bottles of beer (for me) and a pair of bottles of cider (for her).

She tried the Strongbow Dark Fruit and it wasn't too bad. A bit too "candy", though. And too much added sugars and sweeteners.

I was wondering if there is cider around that is not so sweet and can be called "real cider"? ;)

- Niels
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Re: Cider recommendations

Unread postby 3LB » Wed Jan 28, 2015 10:11 am

Scrumpy Jack is far less sweet.

Don't try Woodpecker unless you love your dentist.

There's tons of info on cider via websites too...

Enjoy,
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Re: Cider recommendations

Unread postby dinnerstick » Wed Jan 28, 2015 11:07 am

I have never found a really interesting big production cider. There are some ok ones, bulmer's is drinkable, but you have to find the small cideries to get something interesting, in my opinion. So i'll just rant on a bit about cider. You've got your greater west country; centered around somerset, into worcestershire, wales, devon, etc. Great ciders and, to the northwest, perry. English ciders are growing in popularity here and the bottle shops are starting to carry some interesting ones. One that springs to mind that we can get here is black fox, I am not able to remember any others by name, but there is a cidery near glastonbury that bottles great single variety dry ciders, i will remember those beauties for a long time. Anything labeled as sweet tends to be sickly sweet, and dry tends to be what i would call semi-sweet- ie somewhat backsweetened (or in france, keeved, where nutrient depletion stops fermentation such that the cider is perfectly bottle conditioned, don't try this at home!). West country ciders tend to be highly tannic, can be almost like a towel to the tongue, and medium sharp, but of course they run the gamut, encompassing the whole spectrum of sharpness, sweetness, tannin. Often served still, and when bottled usually medium fizzy. French ciders, I am not aware of any mass produced ones, all the ones i have had (mostly while in normandy) have been lovely, white winey, semi-sweet, a bit spicy, balanced, highly carbonated. Not available readily around these parts. Asturias and basque ciders tend to be very lightly carbonated, like a cask ale, and poured from great heights to wake them up, lovely theatrics. Those that I have had have been also highly tannic and low acid, and very drinkable alongside lovely atlantic seafood. I have never seen them for sale outside spain.
I make a bit of cider every year, and can rant on further about what to do and not to do, but i'd better not.
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Re: Cider recommendations

Unread postby BrauTim » Wed Jan 28, 2015 1:40 pm

I can't drink cider and I know little about it, but I can drink Scrumpy - because it's not cider, but it's made from apples! I can drink Old Rosie (not sure if it's technically cider or not) which is the closest commercially available 'cider' I can think of, but it must be scrumpy cos I can drink it.

Basically the more cloudy and less refined it is, the nicer, less sweet it is.
To brew or not to brew, that would be a stupid question !
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Re: Cider recommendations

Unread postby Elderberry » Wed Jan 28, 2015 2:55 pm

This reminds me of a (rather funny) English friend's rant after a trip to Koksijde.
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Re: Cider recommendations

Unread postby Nesto » Wed Jan 28, 2015 8:05 pm

niels wrote:My girlfriend went to a English shop last week and came home with a few bottles of beer (for me) and a pair of bottles of cider (for her).

She tried the Strongbow Dark Fruit and it wasn't too bad. A bit too "candy", though. And too much added sugars and sweeteners.

I was wondering if there is cider around that is not so sweet and can be called "real cider"? ;)

- Niels

My recommendation is to make your own! I just posted a recipe here.
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Re: Cider recommendations

Unread postby cpa4ny » Wed Jan 28, 2015 11:40 pm

I am just finishing a keg of "Man, I love Apfelwein" cider prepared from the recipe which I found on HBT.

If you like your ciders nice and dry - this is it.
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Re: Cider recommendations

Unread postby cpa4ny » Fri Jan 30, 2015 1:32 am

Photo from last night's dinner - bulgur & arugula salad with grilled halloumi cheese (I love cooking too) with a glass of nicely carbed home-brewed(?) cider :cheers:
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Re: Cider recommendations

Unread postby bierfest » Fri Mar 27, 2015 5:42 pm

I had a few decent ciders (and Perry) from Brittany in the north of France before. But overall im not a big cider drinker
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Re: Cider recommendations

Unread postby hughjampton » Tue Apr 07, 2015 3:19 pm

I sometimes buy cider from Rich's at Mill Farm in Highbridge, Somerset. I usually buy 5 gallons at a mix of one part medium and two parts dry. I sometimes buy perry although I prefer Westons perry from Herefordshire.

A farm shop near where I work sells cider and perry made by local producers. Unfortunately it varies in quality and they don't let you try before you buy. The perry is usually better than the cider.
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